Read The Case for Withdrawal from Afghanistan by Nick Turse Tariq Ali Andrew J. Bacevich Dominique Bari Rodric Braithwaite Pratap Chatterjee Juan Cole Robert Crews Online

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Known as the graveyard of empires, Afghanistan has now been singled out as Obama’s “just war,” the destination for an additional thirty thousand US troops in an effort to shore up an increasingly desperate occupation. Nick Turse brings together a range of leading commentators, politicians, and military strategists to analyze America’s real motives and likely prospects. ThrKnown as the graveyard of empires, Afghanistan has now been singled out as Obama’s “just war,” the destination for an additional thirty thousand US troops in an effort to shore up an increasingly desperate occupation. Nick Turse brings together a range of leading commentators, politicians, and military strategists to analyze America’s real motives and likely prospects. Through on-the-spot reporting, clear-headed analysis and historical comparisons with Afghanistan’s previous occupiers—Britain and the Soviet Union, who also argued that they were fighting a just and winnable war—The Case for Withdrawal From Afghanistan carefully examines the current US strategy and offers sobering conclusions. This timely and focused collection aims at the heart of Obama’s foreign policy and shows why it is so unlikely to succeed....

Title : The Case for Withdrawal from Afghanistan
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ISBN : 9781844674510
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 208 Pages
Status : Available For Download
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The Case for Withdrawal from Afghanistan Reviews

  • Paquita Maria Sanchez
    2018-10-22 03:46

    I would like to see an updated version of this, considering this edition came out shortly before Osama bin Laden made his date with Poseidon. Then again, that very fact would only further press the case presented in this book: that al-Qaeda was the alleged mission, and could have been dealt with in a relatively swift fashion if that were the actual totality of American interests in Afghanistan. Nobody still believes that though, right?Soberingly, however, the fact that this collection is seven years old and still mostly accurate/relevant only serves to highlight how little has actually changed for "the graveyard of empires." Yep, depressing.

  • Simon Wood
    2018-11-05 09:05

    AFGHANISTAN IN PIECES Award winning journalist and author of "The Complex: How the Military Invades Our Everyday Lives" Nick Turse is the editor of this collection of articles on the US/Nato occupation of Afghanistan published in 2010.Only 6 of the 22 articles deal explicitly with the ostensible purpose of this publication: the issue of withdrawal. These make up some of the shorter pieces of this book and vary from the author of "Raising my Voice" Malalai Joya's impassioned plea that "No Nation Can Liberate Another" to the more hard headed "realist" analysis of former CIA station chief Graham Fuller ("Obama's Policies Make The Situation Worse").The rest of the articles cover a range of topics related to the war, the most notable of these come from Juan Cole with his brief look at the continuities in the history of foreign interventions, and Tariq Ali (author of the exceptional "Clash of Fundamentalisms") who looks at aspects of the conflict thus far (2010) in the "Mirage of the Good War". Other articles explore the proliferation of U.S. base building in Afghanistan, the deteriorating plight of woman, the war profiteering going on within and without the country (including the Taliban who take a cut from massive amounts spent on trucking the supplies required to keep the U.S. soldier in theatre), the role of covert and private forces and the tendancy for the conflict to expand into Pakistan.Unfortunately these articles collectively do not form a coherent whole that will assist the reader in forming a comprehensive view of the War in Afghanistan from 2001 to the date of publication. Rather it provides, from a number of different and even differing voices, a variety of insights into specific parts of the conflict, and while these are by and large worth reading overall it remains a fine book rather than an exceptional one.

  • Nicholas
    2018-10-22 04:55

    Generally I agreed with much of the book content and certainly there are few angles about the war in Afghanistan that are unexplored. The contributions were a pretty mixed bag, and while many would be fine on read in isolation on a website on a particular day, I think the book suffered a little from being a collection. There were occasional moments of repetition - by the end I was a bit bored of being told what a US stooge Karzai was. I think the book could have done with better editing as one or two of the contributors seemed to move towards conspiracy theory (the US are so cunning they deliberately foster the insurgency up to a point etc.) or say the odd ridiculous thing (e.g. Chalmers Johnson's call to abolish the CIA - I mean whatever you might think about the CIA is it really sensible to suggest the US no longer needs intelligence agencies?).

  • Paul
    2018-11-03 04:09

    Very informative book looking at the history of the conflict in Afghanistan with essays by a variety of commentators, journalists, ex-diplomats, ex-soldiers, Afghan politicians, etc. Works through a history of previous invasions of Afghanistan from the British and Soviets, events leading to the current situation, analysis of the corruption rampant in the govt. there now, and finishing with a "what should we be doing now?"Learnt a lot from this book