Read It's a Wonderful Christmas: The Best of the Holidays 1940-1965 by Susan Waggoner Online

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Even now that we're all grown up, we can't help but look back on our childhood holidays and hope to recapture that elusive spirit of joyful anticipation. Celebrating Christmas is so often about nostalgia. With a nod and a wink to the days of Christmas past, It's a Wonderful Christmas presents classic images of the Yuletide icons of mid-20th-century America.Bubbler lights aEven now that we're all grown up, we can't help but look back on our childhood holidays and hope to recapture that elusive spirit of joyful anticipation. Celebrating Christmas is so often about nostalgia. With a nod and a wink to the days of Christmas past, It's a Wonderful Christmas presents classic images of the Yuletide icons of mid-20th-century America.Bubbler lights and glow-in-the-dark icicles. Catalogues crammed with toys. Norad bulletins tracking Rudolph's red nose through the nighttime sky. Along with hundreds of such quintessentially American illustrations, author Susan Waggoner stocking-stuffs her lively text with fascinating bits of information, lore, and lists. Wonder what the all-time most popular Christmas song is? How the tradition of the department store Santa got started? The answers are here. Loaded with images of vintage Christmas cards, wrapping paper, magazine ads, Lionel toy trains, and more, all in full color, this charming book will appeal to anyone who associates Christmas with home movies, "The Chipmunk Song," and Santa relaxing with an ice-cold bottle of Coca-Cola....

Title : It's a Wonderful Christmas: The Best of the Holidays 1940-1965
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781584793274
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 104 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

It's a Wonderful Christmas: The Best of the Holidays 1940-1965 Reviews

  • Teresa Gibson
    2018-11-03 18:56

    I want to give this book 5 stars for the illustrations and 2 stars for the text, which I guess averages out to 3 stars. I'm disappointed that there are no credits given for these vintage illustrations from the 1940s to 1960s, many of which are from catalogs and cookbooks. The text needed major editing. So many misspellings. Laura "Ingles"?? Wilder?? And there was some repetition from one section to another. So, don't read this for the words--read it for the glorious pictures!!

  • Kathryn
    2018-11-07 14:56

    For sheer fun and enjoyment, I'd rate this five stars. It's just thorough enough to give you some fun and interesting tidbits, but brief enough that you can read through it fairy quickly and not feel like you have to read a dissertation during the busy holidays. That said, I do wish there had been a bit more back matter, some sources given or suggestions for further reading. Still, this definitely fulfilled my wishes for some vintage holiday charm :-) The pictures are great, some sections (such as Christmas during the war) were really thought-provoking and some of the categories are really fun: toys, fashion, decorations, trees, Christmas cards, etc. I recommend it as a coffee table, conversation piece, or just some fun and light reading. I think it could be fun and nostalgic for those who grew up during this era. (If you want a lot of details, or something on the more religious aspects of the holiday, look elsewhere.)

  • Steven Peterson
    2018-11-05 20:15

    Quite a bit of fun! What Christmas songs were special on a year to year basis? On page 46, we get an answer. 1942, "White Christmas"; 1944, "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas"; 1949, "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer"; 1950, "Sleigh Ride." And so on. One section focuses on gifts for grown ups. 1940s? Folding card tables cost $4; Sunbeam electric razor cost $24.50; a 45 RPM record ran $.45. 1950s? Women's gloves were $2; Portable record player was $47.80. 8 mm movie projector=$75. And so on. Kids' Christmas gifts are also considered, bringing back memories to me. 1952 brought us Mr. Potato Head and 1957 saw the Wham-O Frisbee come onto the scene.Wow! Lots of fun!

  • Lisa Rector
    2018-11-12 15:48

    This was a nostalgic indulgence that was a charming addition to my holiday festivities. I loved reading about this slice of history Ms Waggoner covers. Most of it was before my time, but it was a treat to read. (I also read "Midcentury Christmas" by Sarah Archer, which complemented this book beautifully).

  • Clark
    2018-11-07 16:11

    I enjoyed this book probably more than any other book I have ever read. Illustrations were great. I spent half my time soaking in all the trivia and the other half just staring at the pictures and prices of old merchandise. Any baby boomer that had a decent childhood should love this book.

  • Lisa N
    2018-11-14 19:13

    A history of the commercialization of Christmas. (I did not read this entire book, just sort of skimmed it.) Some of the trivia I found most interesting: Macy’s department store in NY observed its first open-until-midnight Christmas Eve in 1867.During her eight years as First Lady, Mamie Eisenhower not only personally shopped for gifts for the White House staff but wrapped each one herself to save money. (Wow)Little Golden Books were introduced in 1942. Green bean casserole and Chex Mix both made their debut in 1955. The most interesting trivia related to wartime rationing. Here are a few of the items affected: * Americans not involved in vital war work could only purchase 4 gallons of gas per week, enough to drive about 60 miles. Later, this was reduced by a gallon. * New bicycles: Now a legitimate form of adult transportion, purchasing a new bike required a written certificate from the local ration board. * Charge accounts—Bills had to be paid within two months or accounts were frozen. * As of 1942, homeowners could only purchase 66% of the heating oil they’d purchased in 1941. Theoretically, this allowed homes to be heated to 65 degrees but only theoretically. The winter of ’42-‘43 was unusually frigid. Eventually, firewood and coal were also rationed. This book focuses solely on the secular celebration of Christmas. I saw only one religious allusion in the entire book: “Some families went to candlelight church services…” Materialism and trifles: I don’t think this reflects the true pulse of Christmas in this country from 1940-1965.

  • Roberta
    2018-11-07 17:04

    Susan Waggoner has done it again. This volume is perfect for Baby Boomers who want to revisit the Christmases of their youth. The author details the history of many aspects of Christmas as we know it today: trees and decorations, including paper and lights; gifts and the shopping frenzy (which isn't as new as you might expect); Santa; and celebrations and food. This book is beautifully illustrated with nostalgic pictures that will make you feel like a kid again if you're a Boomer like I am.There were three things I had never heard of before: a 1950 Christmas song "There's No Christmas Like a Home Christmas" by Perry Como (look it up on YouTube); a much-desired space-age-looking toy called a Wannatoy Coupe (1946 - before my time); and the now defunct Nesselrode Pie made "famous" by Hortense Spier. I thought about reviving this dessert until I looked up the recipe and saw a photo online. It looks absolutely disgusting. No wonder it fell out of fashion.This is the third Susan Waggoner book of this type I've read. She does extensive research and her books are always well-organized. My only complaint about this one is that it was very poorly edited. There are glaring typographical errors that a good editor should have caught. January Update: During my own Christmas shopping frenzy, I was surprised to hear "There's No Christmas Like a Home Christmas" being played in one of the stores. Curious. I never noticed that song before I read this book - and I am a AVID fan of obscure and/or unusual Christmas songs - and there it was playing for all the world to hear.

  • Keith
    2018-10-31 17:08

    I found this book really interesting, and I loved all the photos. Even though I only come in at the tail end of it's target years, many of my Christmas memories were shaped by the 1940s and 1950s, when my parents were raising my three sisters. There were lots of interesting little tidbits for my inner history buff, and I was surprised at how many things I could point to and say, "Yes, my mother had that."

  • Amy
    2018-10-31 20:50

    I love the advertising, toys, culture and traditions from the past. My favorite holiday is Christmas and I loved this pretty little book. I will look at it every year. I think Christmas was more charming and special in years past. I also think the toys meant more to children and the magic of Santa was more alive back then.

  • Pam
    2018-11-08 19:08

    I adore this book.Purchased it because I wanted to create a Christmas Party one year that reminded me of growing up during this time.Great ideas and choked full of ideas,history,etc.

  • Diana
    2018-10-20 20:14

    Interesting