Read Wade Hampton: Confederate Warrior, Conservative Statesman by Walter Brian Cisco Online

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On the eve of the American Civil War, Wade Hampton, one of the wealthiest men in the South and indeed the United States, remained loyal to his native South Carolina as it seceded from the Union. Raising his namesake Hampton Legion of soldiers, he eventually became a lieutenant general of Confederate cavalry after the death of the legendary J. E. B. Stuart. Hampton’s highlyOn the eve of the American Civil War, Wade Hampton, one of the wealthiest men in the South and indeed the United States, remained loyal to his native South Carolina as it seceded from the Union. Raising his namesake Hampton Legion of soldiers, he eventually became a lieutenant general of Confederate cavalry after the death of the legendary J. E. B. Stuart. Hampton’s highly capable, but largely unheralded, military leadership has long needed a modern treatment. After the war, Hampton returned to South Carolina, where chaos and violence reigned as Northern carpetbaggers, newly freed slaves, and disenfranchised white Southerners battled for political control of the devastated economy. As Reconstruction collapsed, Hampton was elected governor in the contested election of 1876 in which both the governorship of South Carolina and the American presidency hung in the balance. While aspects of Hampton’s rise to power remain controversial, under his leadership stability returned to state government and rampant corruption was brought under control. Hampton then served in the U.S. Senate from 1879 to 1891, eventually losing his seat to a henchman of notorious South Carolina governor "Pitchfork" Ben Tillman, whose blatantly segregationist grassroots politics would supplant Hampton’s genteel paternalism. In Wade Hampton, Walter Brian Cisco provides a comprehensively researched, highly readable, and long-overdue treatment of a man whose military and political careers had a significant impact upon not only South Carolina, but America. Focusing on all aspects of Hampton’s life, Cisco has written the definitive military-political overview of this fascinating man. Winner of the 2006 Douglas Southall Freeman Award....

Title : Wade Hampton: Confederate Warrior, Conservative Statesman
Author :
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ISBN : 9781574886269
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 416 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Wade Hampton: Confederate Warrior, Conservative Statesman Reviews

  • E.LB
    2018-12-24 11:50

    I had read the book, "Hampton's Red Shirts," and enjoyed to so I was interested to read more. This book covers the genealogy of the Hamptons of South Carolina and Wade's service during the War for Independence. Continues after the war with him fighting harder than he did during the war to save his State during the time of reconstruction.

  • Colin Darby
    2018-12-30 10:39

    I had planned on giving this a one-star review, but Cisco accidentally makes an interesting point near the end, that Hampton was an aristocrat, and while he expected the privileges associated with that, he also felt a sense of obligation out of it, unlike Pitchfork Ben Tillman.Nevertheless, I give this book three stars only grudgingly. According to Cisco, Lincoln maneuvered the south into firing the first shots - never mind that Anderson had withdrawn from Fort Moultrie to Fort Sumter where he was less likely to provoke a conflict, that Anderson had attempted to purchase supplies on the economy peacefully until cut off by the city of Charleston, and that President Buchanan had attempted to send a supply ship that was fired on from the shore batteries. You cannot simultaneously trigger an international incident by shooting at a ship, invite a guest speaker (Edmund Ruffin) to pull the lanyard on the first shot, AND claim to be the wronged party. Hampton himself claimed to hope to be able to loot Maryland or Pennsylvania, but God forbid someone loot South Carolina! The entire book is full of things like this. I'd give it a hard one-star except for the accidental discussion of Hampton as a conservative moderating influence.

  • Mike Bauldree
    2018-12-23 12:50

    This book completely and shamelessly covers up the truth about the Red Shirts and rifle clubs of the post-Civil War South and their brutal and (unfortunately) successful campaign to strip all of the liberties of the freedmen after the Civil War.The author seems unapologetic in his attempt to paint Hampton as a patriarch to the black man when, in reality, Hampton, Tillman and other notables of South Carolina used fear to limit the freedom of all non-whites.Hampton was an incredible soldier but his post-war political activities are undeniably racist and only served to keep the South from advancing into the modern age.The author's whitewashing of Hampton's post-war activities displays his own racist tendencies in my opinion.

  • George
    2019-01-02 06:44

    I picked this up as I hadn't read all that much previously on General Hampton. I found the book surprising as the author is a South Carolinian and something of an apologist for the Confederacy, not something you see in most modern Civil War histories. The book is as much about his post Civil War politics as it is about his war time exploits. The author is clearly no fan of the Reconstruction period either, but he does make a valient effort to make Hampton into something of a racial moderate, at least in comparison to his contemporaries. However, given South Carolina's troubled racial history since the Civil War, I found it hard to admire Hampton's success in overcoming the Yankee occupation.