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The first book-length critical and historical account of an ultramodern architectural movement of the 1960s that advocated "living equipment" instead of buildings.In the 1960s, the architects of Britain's Archigram group and Archigram magazine turned away from conventional architecture to propose cities that move and houses worn like suits of clothes. In drawings inspiredThe first book-length critical and historical account of an ultramodern architectural movement of the 1960s that advocated "living equipment" instead of buildings.In the 1960s, the architects of Britain's Archigram group and Archigram magazine turned away from conventional architecture to propose cities that move and houses worn like suits of clothes. In drawings inspired by pop art and psychedelia, architecture floated away, tethered by wires, gantries, tubes, and trucks. In Archigram: Architecture without Architecture, Simon Sadler argues that Archigram's sense of fun takes its place beside the other cultural agitants of the 1960s, originating attitudes and techniques that became standard for architects rethinking social space and building technology. The Archigram style was assembled from the Apollo missions, constructivism, biology, manufacturing, electronics, and popular culture, inspiring an architectural movement -- High Tech -- and influencing the postmodern and deconstructivist trends of the late twentieth century.Although most Archigram projects were at the limits of possibility and remained unbuilt, the six architects at the center of the movement, Warren Chalk, Peter Cook, Dennis Crompton, David Greene, Ron Herron, and Michael Webb, became a focal point for the architectural avant-garde, because they redefined the purpose of architecture. Countering the habitual building practice of setting walls and spaces in place, Archigram architects wanted to provide the equipment for amplified living, and they welcomed any cultural rearrangements that would ensue. Archigram: Architecture without Architecture -- the first full-length critical and historical account of the Archigram phenomenon -- traces Archigram from its rediscovery of early modernist verve through its courting of students, to its ascent to international notoriety for advocating the "disappearance of architecture."...

Title : Archigram: Architecture Without Architecture
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ISBN : 0000262693224
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 252 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Archigram: Architecture Without Architecture Reviews

  • Sean
    2018-10-19 02:13

    Let me fess up, first and foremost, to the fact that I didn't finish this book (yet). After several renewals, I decided to return it to the library to give others that might want it a chance.So why didn't I finish it? I've been trying to come up with a succinct answer to that and am having difficulty. I know I got bogged down in the first third or so that I did read because it was largely about positioning the Archigram project within a larger architectural context (though chiefly a British one). The specifics of architectural debate/production in Britain in the 60s just doesn't interest me all that much (I want to go on a whole tirade about the irrelevance of most architectural debate in general, let alone actual built differences, but I will control myself). And Archigram is interesting largely because its/their ideas so radically transcended the common notions of what architecture can do, even (and especially) the notions of other architects. Putting forth too much effort contextualizing them then, while historiographically worthwhile, feels a bit absurd. If I had stuck with it a bit longer, I no doubt would have reached the more theoretical treatment of the subject and been happier.But another fault that I found was that it all seemed rather disorganized. Not quite chronological nor strictly thematic, I couldn't get what the story was Sadler was trying to tell about Archigram. Whereas it is my recollection that in his previous monographic work,The Situationist City, he positioned himself more clearly in relation to his subject (he had obvious enthusiasm for it), in the present volume he seems far more detached. This is not surprising: the Situationists are exciting; Archigram is, in comparison, merely interesting, or at least far less dangerous.Finally, although this is indeed the first book-length academic treatment of Archigram, there is of course no shortage of articles and non-/quasi-academic books, many produced by or with the participation of the original Archigram members. There was therefore a continual feeling of "Don't I know about all this already?" Again, though, if I gotten to the more conceptual part of the book I might've emerged from that feeling...So what's the verdict? The verdict has to be deferred until I can finish it. Just need to wait, I guess, until it feels like the necessary book to read. In the meantime, if Archigram is your bag, then this might really excite you. If not, I can without hesitation recommendSimon Sadler's other books, Non-Plan and the aforementioned Situationist City.